Are You Looking for a Career That Capitalizes on Your Typing Speed and Accuracy?

Written by Law Terminology. Posted in Legal video, National court reporters

Court reporting services
The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.
It is almost impossible to remember how many times you typed that statement over and over again while you were learning to perfect your keyboarding skills. Although today?s students play Mario Cart video games and various versions of Mevis Beacon teaches typing, you preferred the old fashioned methods.
When the court reporting job was posted, you spent even more time updating The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.
It is almost impossible to remember how many times you typed that statement over and over again while you were learning to perfect your keyboarding skills. Although today?s students play Mario Cart video games and various versions of MAvis Beacon teaches typing, you preferred the old fashioned methods.
When the court reporting job was posted, you spent even more time updating your keyboarding skills. A quick search of the internet indicated that you could also work on the phrase, “A quick movement of the enemy will jeopardize six gunboats.”
Certified Legal Video Specialists Record Testimony to be Presented in Court
Court reporting companies around the country continue to look for certified legal video specialists and legal videographers. Because more than 70% of America?s 50,000 court reporters work outside of the court, location is not a limitation. Applicants who can prove that they have the necessary speed and accuracy requirements, in fact, can work from home transcribing video depositions and other background information. Since all evidence has to be submitted in a written format, typed transcripts must be provided to the judge, the jury, and both the prosecuting team and the defendants.
A Profession Where Speed Matters
The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) requires a minimum speed of 225 words per minute. Applicants who can meet this requirement and are hired often spent as much as 15 hours a week transcribing the spoken word in order to develop these skills. The skills require listening to a variety of dialects and accents, but still maintaining accuracy. And while the basics of traditional typing help many certified legal video specialists get started, the actual profession requires a combination of both typing skills and the transcription skills of the past.
Specialized software helps a court reporter to simply type the first few letters in many basic words and instantly accept the completed word. Even some very familiar phrases that are three to four words in length can be transcribed with a few simple key strokes. Legal lingo that is used over and over in court reports are also accessed with one or two key strokes when the best software packages are used.
Becoming a court reporter is a job that requires speed and accuracy. It is, however, a career that can be completed in the court room or in the comfort of your own home. The best certified legal video specialists are often as busy as they want to be, even getting paid over time during the busiest months.

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